Dead turtle found trapped in fishing nets along East Coast Park

By Tanya Ong, 1st June 2018;

A turtle was found dead and trapped in fishing nets along East Coast Park.

Trapped in fishing nets

It was discovered by wildlife lover Sidi Baker on May 21 at about 4pm.

He noticed the large net in the sea and realised there was a dead turtle trapped inside when he removed the net from the water.

He took to Facebook to share several photos of the turtle, hoping to “create awareness on what’s going in and at our waters and beaches”.

33027140_10209499528520141_6128429151796854784_n33023076_10209499529200158_2778303258748256256_n32939016_10209499530040179_4927084386303606784_nHe also said that he cleared the net and buried the turtle.

This is his full post.

Wildlife harmed

Baker told Mothership.sg that he helps to remove nets or rubbish at the beach as “it might harm sea creatures.”

He also throws away unwanted hooks and lines.

In Singapore, where animal and human habitats overlap, there have been multiple instances of wildlife being hurt as a result of human activity.

Previously, an otter at Pasir Ris Park was found with a rubber ring around it, and a monitor lizard was seen entangled in a plastic bag along the Singapore River.

Source: Mothership.sg

Daily Decay (29th May 2018)

Daily Decay (29th May 2018): Unidentified Rabbitfish (Siganus sp.) @ Pasir Ris

This was one of the many casualties of yet another fish mass mortality event that was triggered by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor in February and March 2015.

American Bullfrog

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)
Upper Seletar Reservoir Park, 5th May 2017

Daily Decay (27th May 2018)

Daily Decay (27th May 2018): Unidentified Snapper (Lutjanus sp.) @ Changi

This was one of the many casualties of a fish mass death in February 2014, caused by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor.

Many of the offshore fish farms in the Straits of Johor raise several species of Snapper, such as John’s Snapper (Lutjanus johnii) and Crimson Snapper (Lutjanus erythropterus), for human consumption, so this carcass is likely to be one of the farmed fishes, instead of being of wild origin.

Daily Decay (25th May 2018)

Daily Decay (25th May 2018): Caterpillar of Oleander Hawkmoth (Daphnis nerii) @ Changi

Several bushes were severely infested with Oleander Hawkmoth caterpillars. Many of the caterpillars were dead, possibly killed by pesticides.

Daily Decay (19th May 2018)

Daily Decay (19th May 2018): Indian Mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta) @ Pasir Ris

This was one of the many casualties of yet another fish mass mortality event that was triggered by a harmful algal bloom in the eastern Straits of Johor in February and March 2015.