Latest photos from WWF Indonesia on the dead Sperm Whales (Phyeter macrocephalus). Morphometry is being conducted now. A Skype call is set for local vets to help them with the necropsy.

Source: Whale Strandings Indonesia Facebook

A baby Dolphin has been found by Kenny Peavy at Pantai Pasir Putih, Jasri. RIP little one. We are gathering more info at the moment to see if the corpse is still on site to do a necropsy.

Source: Soul Surf Project Bali Facebook

Thanks to Soul Surf Project Bali, we learned about a code 2 baby Dolphin in Jasri, East Bali, stranded yesterday morning, found by Mr Kenny Peavy. However, when our contact investigated it, the carcass isn’t there anymore. Either nature (wave, animal) or humans have gotten the baby Dolphin…

Source: Whale Strandings Indonesia Facebook

Based on the colour patterns, this is possibly a Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuata).

Photos: Berita Lima, Suara Pemred, Tribun Pontianak [1], [2], Liputan 6

A code 2 (fresh dead) baby Bryde’s Whale (Balaenoptera edeni) was found at Kubu Raya West Kalimantan today. The approximate length is 6 m. So far, no news of necropsy has been done, and it seems the baby Whale has been refloated back to sea… First news from Rodney Westerlaken from the Sea Turtle WhatsApp group.

Source: Whale Strandings Indonesia Facebook

The taxonomy of the Bryde’s Whale is still far from settled; what we call the Bryde’s Whale has been split into two subspecies or even distinct species by some authorities: the true Bryde’s Whale, a larger species found in tropical and warm temperate waters worldwide (Balaenoptera brydei), and the Sittang or Eden’s Whale, a smaller form that may be restricted to coastal waters of the Indo-Pacific (Balaenoptera edeni). Both species(?) have been recorded from tropical waters of Southeast Asia.

A 96 cm length, code 4 Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) was found at Paloh Beach, West Kalimantan today (9 October 2016). News by Dwi Suprapti WWF Indonesia. Paloh and adjacent coasts of West Kalimantan have resident populations of Finless Porpoise; bycatch is their main anthropogenic threat.

Source: Whale Strandings Indonesia Facebook

Photos: Meteor Jogja, Sorot Gunungkidul & Gunungkidul Post

A code 3 baby Sousa (assuming Sousa chinensis) or Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin was found at Kukup Beach, Kec Tanjungsari, Gunung Kidul, Yogyakarta on 8 October 2016 by a local photographer. The length was reported to be 40 cm, but it’s rather doubtful. No effort has been made so far to retrieve the sample. This might be the first confirmed appearance of Sousa chinensis in the southern coasts of Java. News from Joshua Wendy, photo from MeteorJogja.

Source: Whale Strandings Indonesia Facebook

Yet another Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) stranded in Kalimantan, this time at the Tanjung Keluang Nature Tourism Reserve, Central Kalimantan, 5 days ago (25 Aug’16). No sample has been taken on this one. This is a different stranding from the one at Mempawah, West Kalimantan (see previous post). News from Dwi Suprapti WWF Indonesia.

Source: Whale Strandings Indonesia Facebook

Another Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) (code 4) was also found at Mempawah, West Kalimantan on 29 August 2016. Sample is currently being obtained by BPSPL Pontianak. Photo from Raja Fajar. News from Dwi Suprapti WWF Indonesia.

Source: Whale Strandings Indonesia Facebook