Yesterday some concerned locals brought a severely injured male Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) to the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre. He had been found unable to move on the ground by the side of a road in Phetchaburi. Our first assumption was that he had been hit by a car, as this is common in this area. After he was given a check over by our team of vets it appears he has no wounds that would indicate he had been hit by a car. Was he beaten by humans? Did he fall from a tree? We do not know. At the moment it seems he is paralyzed throughout the left side of his body.

The Long-tailed Macaque is listed as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN Red list of Threatened Species, in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, occurrence in a number of protected areas. Although it is under heavy hunting pressure for the pet trade, meat, sport and trophies, this is not considered a major threat to the species overall. Females are often taken into breeding facilities and males are exported internationally primarily for use in laboratory research. They are regularly persecuted as pests. Habitat loss is also a localised threat, but the species can persist in a variety of habitats and very adaptable.

He is currently at the WFFT Wildlife Hospital under intensive care. He is eating well but we are currently feeding him by hand. We have seen Macaques recover from worse injuries so we are at the moment unsure of the future of this little guy. We will keep you posted on his progress.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand Facebook

Thailand: Flying Squirrels Rescued after their Home was set on Fire
23rd June 2016;

Yesterday evening some concern locals brought in a pair of Grey-cheeked Flying Squirrels (Hylopetes lepidus) into the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre for emergency treatment. They had been found on the floor under a burning tree after it had been set on fire by a farmer who was clearing an area of land to create more space to grow his produce. Human-wildlife conflict doesn’t only occur with megafauna such as Elephants, it affects many of the Earth’s species. Having been almost burned alive in their home these shy tree-dwelling nocturnal rodents fell to the ground, they sustained many burns over their small bodies. Much of the fur has been damaged by the fire, their little hands and feet are badly burned, and their eyelashes have been totally singed off. The WFFT Vet Team have cleaned and treated the burns, they are now being cared for in the WFFT Wildlife Hospital. Unfortunately for these little ones it means they have been displaced, and are now homeless, if they manage to survive this ordeal we will need to find a suitable environment, far away from humans to release them bacl to the wild. We will do everything we can to help these little souls recover. If they pull through they will be taken to a safe protected forest area.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

(This is Part 2 of a 2-part photo set)

Thailand: Flying Squirrels Rescued after their Home was set on Fire
23rd June 2016;

Yesterday evening some concern locals brought in a pair of Grey-cheeked Flying Squirrels (Hylopetes lepidus) into the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre for emergency treatment. They had been found on the floor under a burning tree after it had been set on fire by a farmer who was clearing an area of land to create more space to grow his produce. Human-wildlife conflict doesn’t only occur with megafauna such as Elephants, it affects many of the Earth’s species. Having been almost burned alive in their home these shy tree-dwelling nocturnal rodents fell to the ground, they sustained many burns over their small bodies. Much of the fur has been damaged by the fire, their little hands and feet are badly burned, and their eyelashes have been totally singed off. The WFFT Vet Team have cleaned and treated the burns, they are now being cared for in the WFFT Wildlife Hospital. Unfortunately for these little ones it means they have been displaced, and are now homeless, if they manage to survive this ordeal we will need to find a suitable environment, far away from humans to release them bacl to the wild. We will do everything we can to help these little souls recover. If they pull through they will be taken to a safe protected forest area.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

(This is Part 1 of a 2-part photo set)

Thailand: Dog Attack Muntjac Rescued
15th June 2016;

A few days ago an injured Southern Red Muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak curvostylis) was brought into to the WFFT Wildliife Hospital for urgent treatment after being attacked by a Domestic Dog. He had sustained numerous deep bite wounds, the vet team cleaned the wounds and stitched them up.

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species lists the Southern Red Muntjac as Least Concern (LC), because it remains common throughout most of its range, is resilient to hunting and increases in numbers with logging and presumably other forms of forest disruption, and survives even almost complete conversion of forest to at least some crop plantations. The coming years will see further fragmentation and if hunting continues at current high levels, wider declines and a higher frequency of local extinction than has so far occurred.

We have named him Keng. Keng is now recovering in an open forest enclosure at the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre. We are hopeful he will make a full recovery.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

There is some research suggesting that the Common or Red Muntjac might actually be two distinct species – the Southern Red Muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak) being found south of the Isthmus of Kra, Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, Borneo, Java, Bali and associated islands, while the populations north of the Isthmus of Kra, Indochina, southern China, the Indian subcontinent, and Sri Lanka would be classified as the Northern Red Muntjac (Muntiacus vaginalis). If the taxonomic split is confirmed, this individual might be more accurately identified to to be a Northern Red Muntjac instead.

Thailand: Another Raptor in need of Treatment
12th June 2016;

Last week we received a call from one of WFFT’s long-term supporters who had found a raptor in her garden very weak and unable to fly. Upon arrival the bird was identified as a juvenile Shikra (Accipiter badius). It seems that he may have lost his way after being injured. The WFFT Vet Team examined him, it was found that he has am injured wing, which is luckily not broken, and is severely under weight. He has been with us for a week now and becoming stronger, we hope that his wing will mend and he will be able to return back to the wild. We will keep you posted.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

Thailand: Injured Long-tailed Macaque Arrives at WFFT for Urgent Care
26th May 2016;

Two days ago we received a call from a compassionate Thai tourist who had seen a Macaque in urgent need of help at a temple approximately an hour away from the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre. The WFFT Wildlife Rescue Team headed out immediately to try and save him. Upon arrival the team found the adult male Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) lying on the ground almost motionless. The team investigated further into how this Macaque had ended up on the floor with what appeared to be serious injuries. After talking to the monks of the temple, they were told that the Macaque had fallen out of tree a few days ago due to heavy rain storms, unable to move from the injuries sustained, he had been lying on the ground since the incident. The monks had tried to feed him and give him water, we were told he did not eat nor drink. The team loaded him into the the rescue vehicle and took him directly to a local veterinary clinic for an x-ray to determine how severe the injuries were. The results of the x-ray show that he has both a severely broken arm and leg. He also has numerous, what look like, bite wounds on his chin, these may have been caused by other Monkeys or Feral Dogs. He was taken straight to the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre for treatment.

The Long-tailed Macaque is listed as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, occurrence in a number of protected areas. Although it is under heavy hunting pressure for the pet trade, meat, sport and trophies, this is not considered a major threat to the species overall. Females are often taken into breeding facilities and males are exported internationally primarily for use in laboratory research. They are regularly persecuted as pests. Habitat loss is also a localised threat, but the species can persist in a variety of habitats and very adaptable.

The WFFT Vet Team performed surgery in an attempt to mend his broken bones. The Macaque is currently in intensive care at the WFFT Wildlife Hospital, after recovering from the surgery he is eating and drinking well. We hope that his injuries will mend and he can return home. We will keep you posted on his progress.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

(This is Part 3 of a 3-part photo set)

Thailand: Injured Long-tailed Macaque Arrives at WFFT for Urgent Care
26th May 2016;

Two days ago we received a call from a compassionate Thai tourist who had seen a Macaque in urgent need of help at a temple approximately an hour away from the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre. The WFFT Wildlife Rescue Team headed out immediately to try and save him. Upon arrival the team found the adult male Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) lying on the ground almost motionless. The team investigated further into how this Macaque had ended up on the floor with what appeared to be serious injuries. After talking to the monks of the temple, they were told that the Macaque had fallen out of tree a few days ago due to heavy rain storms, unable to move from the injuries sustained, he had been lying on the ground since the incident. The monks had tried to feed him and give him water, we were told he did not eat nor drink. The team loaded him into the the rescue vehicle and took him directly to a local veterinary clinic for an x-ray to determine how severe the injuries were. The results of the x-ray show that he has both a severely broken arm and leg. He also has numerous, what look like, bite wounds on his chin, these may have been caused by other Monkeys or Feral Dogs. He was taken straight to the WFFT Wildlife Rescue Centre for treatment.

The Long-tailed Macaque is listed as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, occurrence in a number of protected areas. Although it is under heavy hunting pressure for the pet trade, meat, sport and trophies, this is not considered a major threat to the species overall. Females are often taken into breeding facilities and males are exported internationally primarily for use in laboratory research. They are regularly persecuted as pests. Habitat loss is also a localised threat, but the species can persist in a variety of habitats and very adaptable.

The WFFT Vet Team performed surgery in an attempt to mend his broken bones. The Macaque is currently in intensive care at the WFFT Wildlife Hospital, after recovering from the surgery he is eating and drinking well. We hope that his injuries will mend and he can return home. We will keep you posted on his progress.

Source: Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

(This is Part 2 of a 3-part photo set)