Turtle found in Yishun with fish hook in its mouth, dies from wound

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The Turtle succumbed to its injuries after it was found by a passer-by in Yishun Avenue 1.

Lydia Lam, 6th January 2018;

A Turtle that was found in Yishun with a fish hook in its mouth was taken to the Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Acres) to be treated, but it died that same day.

Acres highlighted the incident, which happened on Dec 22, in a Facebook post on Friday (Jan 5).

Acres deputy chief executive Anbarasi Boopal told The Straits Times on Saturday that a passer-by had found the turtle in Yishun Avenue 1 in the wee hours of Dec 22.

“The call came in at 2am. The caller said there was a nail sticking out of its mouth, and we realised it was a fish hook. It was taken to Acres and our vet removed the hook, however, the Turtle died that same evening,” she said.

The turtle was an Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtle (Amyda cartilaginea), native to Singapore. They live in freshwater streams, rivers or in reservoirs. However, it is unclear where this particular turtle came from.

“There are a few possibilities. It could be a native turtle from nearby Seletar Reservoir, or it could have been a released or abandoned turtle,” said Ms Boopal. “People think they are doing good by releasing them into the sea or a water body, but they might die as they are just suddenly left in an unfamiliar environment.”

Ms Boopal said the animal rescue group “increasingly sees a lot of wildlife affected by fish hooks, like Monitor Lizards, Snakes and a lot of Turtles”.

“We have rescued quite a few Red-eared Terrapins (Trachemys scripta elegans) with fish hooks in their mouths, even Box Turtles (Cuora amboinensis),” she said.

She advised members of the public who come across wounded Turtles or animals to call Acres at its hotline 9783-7782.

Callers should provide photos if possible and seek advice on what further actions to take. Some Turtles may bite, particularly if in pain.

Source: The Straits Times

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AN UNDESIRED FATALITY

Imagine the worst sore throat you ever endured, or a large fish bone stuck in your throat. Poor Monsty barely endured the fishing hook wedged in her mouth, and it must have painful and excruciatingly uncomfortable for her. Sadly, she succumbed to her injuries.

The Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtles (Amyda cartilaginea) are a native species, but Singapore also imports several thousands of wild-caught Asiatic Soft-shelled Turtles annually for turtle soup.

You can help wild animals by not buying them from markets or contributing to mercy releases, because it only fuels the demand for the species. Help dispose fishing lines, nets and hooks that may be littered around our environment.

Source: Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Singapore) (ACRES) Facebook

A veterinarian provides initial treatment to the injured Philippine Eagle.

Philippines: DENR chief lauds regional office for saving injured Eagle
By Jonathan L. Mayuga, 30th December 2017;

Environment Secretary Roy A. Cimatu recently lauded the field personnel of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)-Caraga Region Office for saving the life of an injured Philippine Eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) in Tago town, Surigao del Sur province, on December 10.

The members of the DENR-Caraga enforcement division acted with dispatch and provided initial treatment to the raptor after receiving a report of the rescued Eagle’s condition.

The Philippine Eagle, the Philippines’ national bird, is the largest bird of prey in the world and it is endemic to the Philippines. It can be found in four major islands namely, Eastern Luzon, Samar, Leyte and Mindanao.

The DENR-Biodiversity Management Bureau believes there are less than 400 pairs of breeding Eagle left in the wild although there are recent reports of sightings of juvenile Eagles mostly in Mindanao.

Habitat loss, hunting for food and trophy and illegal wildlife trade are among the reasons for the species’ population decline.

The rescued Eagle was suffering from a broken wing, a potentially fatal injury, after when rescued by residents in the mountainous village of Anahao Daan, it was learned.

“This proves that the DENR personnel even in the local field offices are vigilant in caring and protecting our precious wildlife treasures, such as the Philippine Eagle,” Cimatu said in a statement. The Eagle is now being treated at the Philippine Eagle Center (PEC) in Davao City. The PEC is a conservation breeding facility operated by the Philippine Eagle Foundation.

DENR-Caraga Officer in Charge Director Charlie Fabre said the raptor was turned over to the PEC, a day after it was rescued.

He said the bird’s cartilage bone on its left wing had to be cut off “to save its life.”

According to Forester Modesto Lagumbay, chief of the local enforcement and wildlife division, residents found the 4-kilogram Eagle limping along the riverbank and turned it over to Barangay Chairman Datu Aralito Enriquez.

Enriquez brought the Eagle to Mayor Rogelio Pimentel, from whom the DENR team retrieved the raptor.

The wounded Eagle had to be brought fast to an Eagle sanctuary in Davao City, where the veterinarian had immediately performed a surgery on it, Lagumbay said.

“Most likely, the Eagle must have been caught from a snare and struggled to get free and wounded its wing in the process,” Lagumbay added. The Eagle, estimated to be around two years old, will be released once it has fully recovered from injury.

Source: Business Mirror

The injured Elephant at the Borneo Elephant Sanctuary where it was being treated before it died on Wednesday.

Malaysia: Captured Elephant at Telupid died from dehydration due to tongue wound
By Augustine Tuuga, 9th December 2017;

A male Elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) aged 6-7 years died while undergoing treatment at the Borneo Wildlife Sanctuary, Kinabatangan on the morning of December 6, 2017.

The Elephant was captured in Desa Plantation, Ladang Pertama on November 24, 2017 by the Wildlife Department’s Rescue Unit for relocation and treatment because it showed signs of injury on its left front leg and was aggressive towards estate workers and villagers.

Reports of its appearance at Desa Plantation first surfaced on November 5, 2017. Wildlife personnel were sent to manage the situation because it was reported that the Elephant was charging estate workers that came across its paths.

The same Elephant was also reported to have caused panic among people in the nearby villages and estates in Telupid for its aggressive behaviour by charging people it encountered along its path.

After tracking the Elephant for some time, wildlife personnel finally encountered it at Desa Plantation on November 24, 2017, where it was successfully captured.

The Elephant was then taken to Borneo Elephant Sanctuary for treatment.

While undergoing medical examination and treatment, its tongue was found to have a serious wound which was believed to have been caused by gunshot.

The wound on the tongue caused the Elephant to be unable to eat or drink.

The Elephant was found dead on the morning of December 6, 2017 despite efforts by veterinary officers to treat the wounds.

A post mortem to determine the cause of death was conducted on the same day.

During the post mortem procedure, a slug bullet was found lodged in the injured front left leg. There were also signs of other gunshots on the body, but they did not penetrate or cause any internal organ injury.

The cause of death is believed to be due to dehydration because the Elephant was unable to drink due to the injury to its tongue.

While the Wildlife Department fully understand the problem faced by the people associated with Elephant in their environment, it really appreciates cooperation from all concerned by contacting its nearest office for assistance to mitigate disturbance and property loss.

The Wildlife Department meanwhile investigates the case as it involved the death of a totally protected species.

Source: BorneoToday

The male Bornean Pygmy Elephant died while undergoing treatment.
Photo: Sabah Wildlife Department

Malaysia: Bornean Pygmy Elephant dies while undergoing treatment at Sabah sanctuary
By Avila Geraldine, 8th December 2017;

A male Bornean Pygmy Elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) died while undergoing treatment at the Borneo Wildlife Sanctuary in Kinabatangan, two days ago.

The Elephant, aged between six and seven, was found dead in the morning by veterinary officers of the Sabah Wildlife Department.

Department director Augustine Tuuga, in a statement, said a post-mortem examination was conducted on the same day to establish the cause of death.

“During the examination, a bullet slug was found lodged in its injured front left leg.

"There were also sign of gunshots on the body but they did not penetrate or cause any internal organ injury.

"The cause of death is believed to be due to dehydration as the Elephant was unable to drink due to an injury on its tongue,” he said.

The department’s rescue unit had on Nov 24 captured the Elephant, which is listed as a totally protected species, in Desa Plantation, Ladang Pertama for relocation and treatment.

It showed sign of injury on its left front leg and was aggressive towards estate workers and villagers.

Its appearance at Desa Plantation was first reported on Nov 5.

Tuuga said wildlife personnel were sent to manage the situation because the Elephant was reportedly charging estate workers who came across its path.

The same Elephant was also reported to have caused panic among nearby villages and estates in Telupid for its aggressive behaviour.

“After tracking the Elephant for sometime, wildlife personnel finally encountered the Elephant at Desa Plantation Nov 24 and successfully captured it.

"The Elephant was then taken to the Borneo Elephant Sanctuary for treatment.

"While undergoing medical examination and treatment, its tongue was found to have a serious wound which was believed to have been caused by a gunshot.

"The wound on the tongue left the Elephant unable to eat or drink,” explained Tuuga.

While the department fully understood the problem faced by residents who encounter the Elephant, Tuuga called on people to alert the authorities.

“We will investigate the case further as it involves the death of a totally-protected species,” he said.

This is the second incident involving the death of Bornean Pygmy Elephants this week.

On Tuesday, a bull Elephant was found dead with three gunshot wounds, within the Cenderamata Plantation Estate in Tawau. Its tusks were intact.

Last month, another male Elephant with its tusks intact was also shot dead within the same plantation.

Source: New Straits Times

Photo: Sabah Wildlife Department, via New Straits Times

Malaysia: Borneo Pygmy Elephant dies due to dehydration after being shot
8th December 2017;

An endangered Borneo Pygmy Elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) has died from dehydration triggered by gunshot wounds.

Veterinarians and wildlife rangers could only watch helplessly as the gentle jumbo died due to injuries on his tongue and mouth.

“It could not eat or drink as we tried to provide treatment at the Borneo Wildlife Sanctuary,” said Sabah Wildlife Department director Augustine Tuuga in a statement late Friday (Dec 8).

He said the seven-year-old bull Elephant died on Dec 6, more than a week after it was rescued from the Desa Plantation near Telupid, some 210km from here.

Tuuga said they had received reports from villagers and estate workers about an injured Elephant that was running amok.

He said villagers said the Elephant was charging at people that were in its path.

“It was then captured on Nov 24 for relocation,” he said.

Tuuga said the Elephant was then taken to the Borneo Elephant Sanctuary for treatment.

While undergoing medical examination and treatment, its tongue was found to have serious wounds, believed to have been caused by gunshots.

“We are not sure whether this Elephant was shot by poachers or villagers,” Tuuga said.

A post-mortem found a bullet lodged in the Elephant’s front left leg, as well as other signs of gunshots on the body.

“However, the wounds on the body were only external,” Tuuga said.

He urged villagers and estate owners as well as workers to inform wildlife rangers if they come across Elephants on their land instead of handling the matter on their own.

Source: The Star

Photo: Sabah Wildlife Department, via New Straits Times

Malaysia: Injured Elephant captured in Sabah oil palm plantation dies
8th December 2017;

A male Elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) that was captured at an oil palm plantation in Telupid last month died at the Borneo Wildlife Sanctuary in Kinabatangan last Wednesday.

Sabah Wildlife Director Augustine Tuuga said the Elephant, estimated to be six or seven years of age, had shown signs of injury when it was captured by the Wildlife Department’s Rescue Unit.

He said the Elephant was reported to have been aggressive towards plantation workers and villagers in surrounding areas, which led to its capture on Nov 24 at Desa Plantation, and was then taken to Borneo Elephant Sanctuary.

“While undergoing medical examination and treatment, its tongue was found to have serious wound, believed to have been caused by a gunshot.

"The wound on the tongue made the Elephant unable to eat or drink,” he said in a statement here tonight.

Tuuga said a post mortem conducted on the Elephant found a bullet lodged in the injured front left leg and there were also gunshot marks on the body, but did not penetrate or caused any internal organ injury.

"Dehydration is believed to be the cause of death because the Elephant was unable to drink due to the injury on its tongue,” he said.

Tuuga said the Sabah Wildlife Department would be investigating the case as it involved the death of a totally protected species.

“While the Sabah Wildlife Department fully understand the problem faced by the people associated with Elephant in their environment, we would really appreciate cooperation from all concerned by contacting the department’s nearest office for assistance to mitigate disturbance and property loss,” he said.

Source: Malay Mail