Photos: Jackie Lim Facebook

2 injured in accident involving wild boar near Tuas Checkpoint
Read more at http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/2-injured-in-accident-involving-wild-boar-near-tuas-checkpoint-9259060

By , 2017;

Two people were injured when a Wild Boar (Sus scrofa vittatus) turned up at the Ayer Rajah Expressway on Thursday (Sep 28) morning, causing an accident.

The Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) said it despatched an ambulance to the scene near Tuas Checkpoint, after receiving an alert at about 7.30am.

The injured duo – a 38-year-old male motorcyclist and his 35-year-old female pillion rider – were sent conscious to Ng Teng Fong General Hospital, said police.

Photos posted on public Facebook group Traffic Report JBS show a group of motorcyclists gathered around the injured as the Boar lay, apparently dead, on the road.

Facebook user Jackie Lim, who had uploaded the shots, said: “The Wild Boar caused a traffic accident”, adding that it happened about 500m after the Tuas Checkpoint.

Wild Boars have been spotted before in Tuas. Videos of a large herd gathering near the Tuas bus terminal were posted online in June. The video clips showed at least 20 standing on the road in front of the National Transport Workers’ Union canteen.

Source: Channel NewsAsia

Photos: Jackie Lim Facebook

Motorcyclist and passenger injured in accident involving Wild Boar near Tuas Checkpoint
By Lydia Lam, 28th September 2017;

The sudden appearance of a Wild Boar (Sus scrofa vittatus) along the Ayer Rajah Expressway (AYE) after the Tuas Checkpoint early on Thursday (Sept 28) caused a traffic accident that sent two to hospital and killed the animal.

Pictures of the scene posted on Johor Baru traffic group Traffic Report JBS show a dead Boar on the road, and a large group of motorcyclists gathered around a man lying on the road.

Facebook user Jackie Lim shared the photos, warning commuters in Chinese to be careful while driving in that area.

He wrote that the accident occurred at 7.15am, about 500m away from the Tuas Checkpoint.

“After I reached Singapore, there was this accident,” he wrote. “The Boar caused a traffic accident, luckily nobody died.”

The Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) told The Straits Times that it was alerted to the accident along AYE, towards Jurong, at 7.24am and dispatched an ambulance.

The police told ST that a 38-year-old male motorcyclist and his 35-year-old female pillion rider were taken to Ng Teng Fong General Hospital.

Wild Boars have previously been spotted in the Tuas area.

In June, a large herd of Wild Boars was caught on camera swarming a bus interchange in Tuas.

Wildlife group Animal Concerns Research & Education Society (ACRES) later set up metal barriers to prevent the animals from entering the terminal.

In November last year, a 25-year-old motorcyclist was hospitalised after colliding with a Wild Boar on the Bukit Timah Expressway.

In April last year, a 49-year-old motorcyclist was also injured after a Wild Boar dashed out into the Seletar Expressway.

According to the Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority’s (AVA’s) website, Wild Boars are “unpredictable animals and can be dangerous”.

“Due to their solid body build, Wild Boars are considered to be particularly dangerous when involved in car accidents,” said the advisory.

Here is what to do if you encounter a Wild Boar, according to an advisory by AVA, the National Parks Board and Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

  • Be calm and move slowly away from the animal. Do not approach or attempt to feed the animal.
  • Keep a safe distance and do not corner or provoke the animal, that is, by using flash while taking pictures.
  • If you see adult Boars with young piglets, leave them alone. These are potentially more dangerous because they may attempt to defend their young.

Source: The Straits Times

  1. The skeleton of Jubi the Sperm Whale on display at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum.
  2. CEO of Temasek Holdings Ho Ching officially unveiled Jubi on Monday.
  3. Jubi was given her name after being discovered during Singapore’s Jubilee year.
  4. The 10.5m female Sperm Whale suffered several broken bones in her spine, as well as a huge gash on her body.
  5. Analysis from the DNA team discovered that Jubi had the same mitochondrial genetic signature common in Sperm Whales found in the North Pacific Ocean.
  6. Protected by a whaling moratorium, sperm whales are now listed as vulnerable to extinction by conservation authorities.

Photos: Ngau Kai Yan

In pictures: Jubilee Whale Exhibit at Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum
By Dawn Karen Tan, 14th March 2016;

Remember the female Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) that washed ashore in late July last year? Its skeleton is now on display at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum.

The Jubilee Whale Exhibit – at the mammals section of the museum – was officially unveiled on Monday evening (Mar 14) by Ms Ho Ching, chief executive of Temasek Holdings.

After deciding to salvage the Whale last year, the museum launched an appeal for funds to preserve its skeleton. Nicknamed “Jubi”, the exhibit will help educate visitors on whale biology and the threats faced by these mammals.

The Whale, which had been discovered off the coast of Jurong Island, had presented authorities with a conundrum: Allow it to sink and float away, or salvage it? The Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum chose the latter.

“Surprisingly, everyone came together, doing a lot of abnormal things, and against all the odds… we managed to get the Whale to stay in Singapore waters, bring it all the way to Tuas and get it ready for processing,” said CEO of the museum Mr Peter Ng.

Nine museum staff were deployed to salvage the 10.5-metre specimen. Earning the nickname “Jubi Lee” – as she was found during Singapore’s Jubilee year – the Whale was to become the first Sperm Whale ever recorded in the coastal waters around Peninsular Malaysia.

Analysis from the DNA team discovered that Jubi had the same mitochondrial genetic signature common in Sperm Whales found in the North Pacific Ocean.

Examination of the carcass shed some light on Jubi’s life and her final days.

With her stomach filled with indigestible squid beaks, it was found that she mainly fed on live squid, but there was also another troubling discovery – marine trash.

It was apparent that she had not eaten recently. Her body bore a terrible wound – a huge gash possibly incurred from a boat’s propeller. She also suffered several broken bones in her spine. Scientists deduced the injury had left her unable to hunt. She had likely died just a few days before being discovered.

Protected by a whaling moratorium, Sperm Whales are now listed as vulnerable to extinction by conservation authorities.

This is not the first time the museum has had a large whale. The famous “Singapore Whale” was displayed in the old museum until 1974. After it was given away to another museum, all efforts to retrieve it had failed.

Staff at the museum saw Jubi’s arrival as a gift.

Mr Ng said: “For fate or whatever reason, it has come back into our hands. It shows what crazy people can do in desperate situations. At the end of the day, we can come together to get something important done.

"Is the whale important? Oh yes, it’s important, because it’s a symbol – a symbol that we are doing something right.”

Source: Channel NewsAsia

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/starterkit/servlet/fragment?id=2601454&view=embed

The Jubilee Whale Exhibit was officially unveiled on Monday evening at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum.

Source: Channel NewsAsia

After 249 days, the Singapore Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is finally ready to meet the public. It has been an amazing journey for the museum, and we thank all who have helped.

Do come and see the #SGWhale and discover more about her story, and how we can be better stewards of the marine environment!

See you at the museum!

Source: Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum Facebook

HAPPENING NOW: The lovely bones of Jubilee the Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) have officially gone on display at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum.

Photos: Ngau Kai Yan

Source: Channel NewsAsia Facebook

Visitors can get a closer look at the Singapore Whale at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum
Photos: Audrey Tan

Get up close to the Singapore Whale at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum
By Audrey Tan, 14th March 2016;

Get up close to the Republic’s very own Moby Dick from Tuesday (March 15), when the skeleton of a Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) found here goes on display at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum.

The exhibit, on display at the mammals section, was unveiled on Monday evening by Ms Ho Ching, chief executive of Temasek Holdings, at the official launch of the Jubilee Whale Exhibit.

Unlike most other Whale skeleton exhibits, that are usually hung horizontally near the ceiling, the Singapore Whale will be displayed in a diving pose, with its enormous skull just 1m off the floor.

“We wanted to give the Whale a natural pose in a limited space,” explained museum conservator Kate Pocklington, who was part of the museum’s team of five researchers involved in the preservation of the skeleton.

Other than marvelling at the sheer size of the marine mammal, visitors to the museum, in the National University of Singapore, can also learn more about its biology, the threats faced by these creatures, and the story of its discovery.

The carcass of the 10.6m-long adult female Sperm Whale was found floating off Jurong Island on July 10, 2015 – the first time that the marine mammal has been spotted in Singapore waters.

It was nicknamed Jubi Lee by staff at the museum, as it had been found during the nation’s Golden Jubilee year.

After it was found, researchers from the museum worked for months to preserve the skeleton and collect as much data as possible from the carcass.

The museum’s head, Professor Peter Ng, told The Straits Times that it was rare for the Whale skeleton to be preserved and mounted in just eight months.

“In most countries, the carcass is buried, allowed to rot, and only after several years is the skeleton excavated. Months or years may pass before the skeleton is made ready,” he said.

“We have expedited the process through very hard work – no mean feat. And it did not come cheap.”

The museum has raised about $1.3 million for scientific and educational efforts related to the Sperm Whale carcass.

Half of it went to setting up the exhibit, while the remaining half will be used for marine biodiversity education and research.

The museum intends to use the Whale to highlight the importance of keeping the oceans healthy.

Sperm Whales feed mainly on squid, which have beaks that cannot be digested. But researchers also found plastic trash in the whale’s gut.

Ambassador-at-large Tommy Koh, who attended a fundraising dinner for the whale in February, said he was overjoyed by the return of a Whale to Singapore.

The skeleton of a 13m-long Indian Fin Whale (a disused name for Blue Whale) (Balaenoptera musculus) had been displayed at the old National Museum from 1907 to 1974 before it was presented as a gift to Malaysia.

Prof Koh said: “Jubi Lee is even better than the Whale we gave away because it was found in our waters, because it belongs to a species seldom found in our waters, and because the skeleton is in perfect order.”

Source: The Straits Times